Things I've Tagged ‘Design’

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#CSS, #Design, #Web Development

Micro Trend: Non-Rectangular Headers

I love techniques that allow designers and developers to “break” the boxed in nature of web design in a general sense. As a micro trend, non-rectangular headers have become one of my favorite techniques to accomplish this ask.

So, how do I do this?

Per CSS-Tricks, there are several methods available to accomplish this particular task:

  1. Background images, which appears to be one of the weaker methods
  2. Inline svgs, which can be modified pretty well, and reduce the load on the browser
  3. border-radius, which allows for the more convex circular look
  4. clip-path, which appears to have browser compatibility issues
  5. And my favorite, transform: skew
Stripe Home Page
The Stripe home page using transform: skew.

As mentioned above, my preference in this case is transform: skew, although it introduces extraneous elements to the page–a seemingly forgotten rule is to not do so for presentational purposes–but this can certainly be accomplished with pseudo elements.

The article referenced above uses an extra element in the document to create the effect–which is perfectly reasonable–as does the stripe website.

Stripe’s homepage design uses this method, and even more brilliantly, they include a few children spans (each is a block of color) that get skewed with the parent element, creating a more complex and colorful effect.

I don’t entirely know that I like the extra elements, but I come from a slightly different era of development that saw this technique of creating decoration-only elements as heresy, while still using it regularly.

Anyway, I enjoy looking at the sorts of things that front end devs do to accomplish what UX/UI designers come up with.


#Design

All materials have a grain, whether wood or pixels, and that grain suggests the best way to work. Go with the grain and one will find sturdiness combined with tremendous flexibility—a natural and exciting give that grounds decisions and excites with possibilities. Work against the grain and the work becomes precarious, difficult, and fragile. Instead of the elegant bending that software requires to adjust to different screens, uses, and situations, the work breaks because it can not adapt.

Frank Chimero



#Branding, #Coca-Cola, #Design

Coca-Cola Variants With New Packaging Strategy

Coca-Cola is switching gears with a new packaging strategy, according to AdAge. Their focus is going to be on variants of Coca-Cola rather than on separate brands depending on consumer desire.

Earlier this year, Mr. de Quinto told Ad Age that loyal consumers “always have loved the brand Coca-Cola.” But “there are moments when this consumer wants to reduce their sugar intake.” In those cases, Coke was forcing people to buy into a completely separate identify, he explained, referring to Diet Coke and Coke Zero.

He goes on to describe how this strategy implied that the product wasn’t really for everyone–that it wasn’t all inclusive–and that’s an intriguing notion.

Proposed product lineup. Photo from Coca-Cola, used at AdAge

8oz_Glass_One_Brand_line_up

Same family but no different–they’ve changed nothing about the product.

From an aesthetic standpoint, I love this strategy. Everything feels like a product family, the approach is clean, and the rationale surrounding it seems rather intriguing. By positioning these options as variants of Coke, rather than separate products, I wonder if it will create confusion in-store or if this will seem like a natural evolution for consumers?

Overall, I’m curious to see what it looks like when it is introduced later this year.







#Design, #Education

Who is our generations James Bond? Jason Bourne. He can’t trust his employer, who demanded ultimate loyalty and gave nothing in return. In fact, his employer is outsourcing his work to a bunch of foreign contractors who presumably work for less and ask fewer questions. He’s given up his defined benefit pension (Bourne had a military one) for an individual retirement account (safe deposit box with gold/leeching off the gf in a country with a depressed currency).

In fact his employer is going to use him up until he’s useless. He can’t trust anyone, other than a few friends he’s made on the way while backpacking around. Medical care? Well that’s DIY with stolen stuff, or he gets his friends to hook him up. What kinds of cars does he have? Well no more company car for sure, he’s on his own on that, probably some kind of import job. What about work tools? Bourne is on is own there too. Sure, work initially issued him a weapon, but after that he’s got to scrounge up whatever discount stuff he can find, even when it’s an antique. He has to do more with less.

The Bourne Aesthetic